Pre flop Odds

In poker, it's crucial to know how to evaluate your chances of winning a pot, in order to decide if you have to call, fold or raise. Thankfully, all the basic percentages are quite easy to learn in Hold'em, as there are the many similar situations that frequently arise.

Here are the most common pre-flop hand matchups:

 
VS
81.71 %   17.82 %
 
VS
86.45 %   12.32 %
 
VS
77.22 %   22.47 %
 
VS
70.82 %   28.77 %
 
VS
5.86 %   92.80 %
 
VS
29.74 %   69.38 %
 
VS
43.03 %   56.55 %
 
VS
71.62 %   23.70 %
 
VS
28.0 1%   71.61 %
 
VS
29.68 %   68.20 %
 
VS
59.29 %   40.25 %
 
VS
63.83 %   35.75 %
 
VS
62.86 %   36.75 %
 



Aces are by far the very best starting hand in Hold'em. Aces are a large favorite against any other hand. Should your opponent hold a pair of Aces, the best hand that you can have to counter this would be a low/middle suited connector such as a 7-8, which has about a 23% chance of winning.

A pair of Kings is a big favorite against any hand that doesn't include an Ace. However, even in that case, Kings are still a 70% favorite. Only a pair of Aces is a clear favorite against a pair of Kings.

Ace-King is a good hand before the flop, especially when suited. Against any pair less than a pair of Kings, the odds are roughly 50-50, also called a “coin-flip”. Ace-King can therefore be considered a favorite against any non-paired hand. However, it has less chance of winning against a pair of Aces or Kings.

An Ace-King shows its strength when matched against any hand containing an Ace or a King, with the exception of paired Aces or Kings (obviously). A-K dominates hands such as Ace-Queen and should therefore win most of the time. The same applies to hands such as Ace-Jack, King-Queen, King-Jack, etc. These are all good starting hand, but they will rarely beat an Ace-King in the hole.

Any combination of an Ace with another card (A-2, A-3 and up to A-K) has only a 28% chance to win against a pair superior to the kicker after the Ace. Even a pair of Kings will win only 71% of the time against a hand such as Ace-Deuce off-suit.

Finally we have the match-up of non-paired hands that do not share a kicker. For example, Ace-King vs. Queen-Jack. Usually the hand with the higher ranked card is the favorite, with a 59% to 63% chance of winning.

You can apply the above odds to many similar situations. So doing will help you to calculate the odds with matches such as King-Queen vs. King-Jack (the dominated hand), King-Ten against pocket Queens and so on.